Civil rights pioneer Clara Luper will be honored all weekend


An Oklahoma civil rights icon will be honored this weekend for her work to end segregation. The celebration marks 64 years since Clara Luper and her 13 students sat down at the Katz Diner. The party honoring Clara Luper’s legacy kicks off Thursday night at the Yale Theater. A jazz concert kicked off the weekend meant to honor a woman who changed the world. “His name is a fixture,” said artist and activist Jabee Williams. “But there are still people here who have never heard of her.” |MORE| Iconic OKC spot that changed history to be remembered forever Clara Luper Sit-In PlazaLuper and 13 students participated in the sit-in, launching one of the nation’s first civil rights protests . “A lot of those people are still here today and they can still tell those stories and we need to hear those stories and hear first hand,” Williams said. The four-day celebration will include art exhibits, as well as talks from some of Luper’s original students and his daughter. On Saturday, Oklahoma City will recreate that historic day in 1958. “The reason the reenactment is so cool is that we get to participate and walk through the shoes of those early sit-in-ers,” Williams said. The marchers will start at Frontline Church and make their way to Kaiser, celebrating the protest that helped illuminate the civil rights movement. “We also have 13 students who will represent the top 13, and it’s really impactful and it gets quite emotional. It’s powerful,” Williams said.

An Oklahoma civil rights icon will be honored this weekend for her work to end segregation.

The celebration marks 64 years since Clara Luper and her 13 students sat down at the Katz Diner.

The party honoring Clara Luper’s legacy kicks off Thursday night at the Yale Theater.

A jazz concert kicked off the weekend meant to honor a woman who changed the world.

“His name is a fixture,” said artist and activist Jabee Williams. “But there are still people here who have never heard of her.”

|MORE| Iconic OKC location that changed history to be forever remembered as Clara Luper Sit-In Plaza

Luper and 13 students took part in the sit-in, launching one of the nation’s first civil rights protests.

“A lot of those people are still here today and they can still tell those stories and we need to hear those stories and hear them first hand,” Williams said.

The four-day celebration will include art exhibits, as well as talks from some of Luper’s original students and his daughter. On Saturday, Oklahoma City will reenact this historic day in 1958.

“The reason the re-enactment is so cool is because we can participate and walk in the shoes of those early sit-in-ers,” Williams said.

The marchers will start at Frontline Church and head towards Kaiser’s, celebrating the protest that helped illuminate the civil rights movement.

“We also have 13 students who will represent the top 13, and it’s really impactful and it gets quite emotional. It’s powerful,” Williams said.

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